Monkey Business Report: Judicial appointment edition

monkeyIt’s unusual to hear about Republican political shenanigans in yellow-dog Democrat Robeson County. But it looks like our simian friends have been quite active there recently. 

There was a state district court seat coming open in the county.  Judge John Carter, a black conservative-leaning former prosecutor, announced his retirement.  An appointment to fill out Carter’s term would be needed.

So, long-beleaguered local Republicans saw an opportunity.  They contacted the governor’s office to see what needed to be done.  Sources tell me the governor’s office gave this feedback:  “We rely on the recommendation of the local bar.”

Well, in Robeson County, the members of the bar voted to endorse Lumberton attorney — and registered Republican — Jack Moody for the open court seat.  The runner-up in the bar vote was Pembroke attorney Dale Deese, registered as unaffiliated.

laughGuess who the governor picked?  That’s right.  NOT the Republican.  NOT the guy endorsed by the local bar.  (Also NOT the guy endorsed by key local Republicans.)  Second-Place finisher Deese got the nod from the Republican governor.

If you check the state board of elections website, you’ll see that Deese, while registered unaffiliated, has NEVER asked for a Republican ballot.  Not in 2008, 2012 nor in March of this year, all times when McCrory was on the ballot.   Registered Republican Moody, on the other hand, voted Republican as recently as the 2016 GOP primaries. 

Let’s look at Deese’s contribution history.  Interestingly, he has a history as a small donor.  He gave now-former state Rep. Ronnie Sutton (D) $100 in 2006, $200 in 2008, and $200 in 2010.  He gave $125 to Mike Easley in 2000, and $100 in 2004.  In 2016, he gave GOP attorney general nominee Buck Newton $200.  He also gave NC House speaker Tim Moore $475.  judge

What’s most interesting are Deese’s late-2015 donations to McCrory.  On October 29, he gave $25 to the McCrory campaign.  On November 8, he gave $2500 to McCrory.

Moody did not donate to McCrory.

And here we are in mid-April with Deese getting the judicial appointment.

 

 

6 comments for “Monkey Business Report: Judicial appointment edition

  1. Jason
    April 16, 2016 at 3:15 pm

    Another reason the Republican base is fed-up with McCrory. November is going to be very ugly for the governor.

    • James musselwhite
      April 17, 2016 at 2:09 pm

      This does not surprise me. The republicans are just as gutless as the democrats. All a bunch of hyprocrats. That’s why I changed to independent. Jack moody deserved this judge appointment. The governor will pay for this.

  2. It all about Pat, Again!
    April 16, 2016 at 6:50 pm

    This Is very fimilar to all grassroots Republicans. Appointment are based on campaign donations not how qualified or committed they are to the GOP. Do we need four more years of this?

    When Pat says he is behind Republicans, I guess that means drop your pants!

  3. Republican Trader
    April 16, 2016 at 7:02 pm

    Lol Pat did they same with all the Comminity College appointments.

    How stupid is this? Pat actually beleives all his Democrats Friends will help him and surly they will, right back to Charlotte.

  4. Biggs
    April 16, 2016 at 8:22 pm

    Excellent article but you failed to mention the most important thing and most glaring distinction between the two nominees: Jack Moody is the most qualified candidate having practiced and appeared in district as well as superior courts of Robeson county every day for the last 20 some years. It is that experience that sets Mr. Moody apart from dale deese as the most qualified candidate and the reason that Moody’s fellow bar members overwhelming supported him thru their votes as the next district court judge.. Also, Moody is presently the president of the Robeson county bar..

  5. GUWonder
    April 17, 2016 at 8:03 am

    Appointments are a real sore point between the governor and the party activists. Too many of the wrong people are getting appointed to things for the wrong reasons, while sound policy oriented folks who have paid their dues in the party are usually being ignored. This is just one particularly glaring example of what has become a pattern.

    All of this makes many Republican activists lukewarm toward McCrory. I have even had a couple of former county GOP chairmen tell me they are so upset at some of McCrory’s appointments that they plan to vote Democrat for the first time in their lives in the governor’s race.

    It did not have to be this way. If McCrory had been smart enough to handle appointments like Jim Martin did, he would have had the same loyal, fired-up base that Martin had going into his reelection. Unfortunately, he didn’t and he doesn’t.

    All of this makes the coup plot against the grassroots party leadership by a Central Committee group that many associate with McCrory all the more dangerous to the governor. Kicking out a grassroots leader and imposing a McCrory ally in his place may be all it takes to convert lukewarm supporters to people who will flat out abandon the governor. If the governor wants to have a chance at reelection, he does not need the bloodbath planned for April 30.

    In spite of his flaws, I would prefer McCrory to the alternative, and I hope he jerks some chains to stop the planned bloodbath on April 30. Getting control of the Raleigh apparatus is a small thing compared to pissing off lots of party activists all over the state. Elephants tend to have long memories.

    One curious thing is the contribution by this position buying judge to Speaker Tim Moore. I wonder if what he bought was an endorsement from Moore? A Public Records Act request for communications between Moore and McCrory might be interesting. There is far too much pay for play in the House leadership.

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