Liberal use of the word “conservative”

lazyThe N&O is excited.  They are trumpeting a new arrival on the political scene: 

A North Carolina chapter of a national network of conservatives that wants to put the brakes on — if not outright abolish — the death penalty has become active this year.

A number of prominent Republicans have joined N.C. Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty: Les Merritt, the former state auditor; Ernie Pearson, a former assistant commerce secretary; David Robinson, once the Wake County GOP chairman; Marshall Hurley, former state Republican Party general counsel; Steve Monks, former Durham County GOP chairman; Mark Edwards, the Nash County GOP chairman; and Gerald Galloway, retired police chief in Southern Pines. […] 

Whaaaaa? Gerald Galloway?  I know Gerald.  He is a good guy, but he is neither conservative nor Republican.  He has been driving around town for the last five years or so with  a “Kay Hagan” campaign sticker on his car’s rear bumper.  Gerald has also been quite active with the Moore County Democratic Party for years.  Nice try, though. 

5 thoughts on “Liberal use of the word “conservative”

  1. If the N&O wasn’t so lazy, they’d check Galloway’s political contribution reports here and see he’s a big Dem: http://app.ncsbe.gov/webapps/cf_trans_search/cf_transinq_results.aspx.

    I volunteered for Les Merritt’s campaigns and David Robinson’s when he ran for judge 2 years ago. Both are good guys, and the conservative monolith for the death penalty is starting to show cracks, and not just from RINOs.

    Marshall Hurley was a Republican lawyer back when there were no Republican lawyers in NC. IIRC, he went to high school with such prominent conservatives/Republicans as Justice Paul Newby, Judge Rick Elmore, Sheriff BJ Barnes, Senator Trudy Wade, and Gov. Pat McCrory.

    I believe that the death penalty, in and of itself, is not unconstitutional. However, the system that the liberal ’70s Supreme Court has imposed on us today has rendered it highly arbitrary, and the law – particularly the imposition of criminal punishment, including capital punishment – should be stable and predictable, not arbitrary. Arbitrary laws may be unconstitutional. As crazy as it may sound, automatic capital punishment for 1st degree murder is less arbitrary.

    Just some food for thought.

    1. Marshall Hurley has been in the moderate wing of the Republican Party all his life, not the conservative wing. Even way back in the College Republicans, he was one of the ringleaders of a group of moderates that defeated the conservative group that had been running things. It is not at all surprising to see him take moderate positions on issues.

  2. Not familiar with Mr. Galloway, but I did find it interesting that such an anti-death penalty group is running around now.

    I’ve never been a fan of the death penalty – it’s such a final, irreversible step – I dont like the idea that a government should have the power to legally kill one of its own citizens, and I absolutely dont trust the competency of any government to be able to judge and convict people perfectly, without mistake, 100% of the time.

    I think life without parole is preferable. (Of course, how easy and comfortable that particular life is allowed – that’s certainly very review-able) 🙂

  3. Ran into these people at the NC GOP Convention in Cherokee. There “moderate” stance fades in a few questions … “What do you do with the person SENTENCED TO LIFE for murder, who commits murder in prison?” being just one. They can call themselves whatever they want, doesn’t make it true.

  4. When I was asked to join the “Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty” group, I made it clear I wasn’t a conservative. I am a “Social Moderate”. I consider myself a “Fiscal Conservative”. However, not at the expense of denying help to disadvantaged people. I was told it didn’t matter. I was somewhat surprised myself that I was aligned (potilically) with republican leaders. However, we all beat the same drum with regard to the death penalty. For that, I am proud to be a part of this partnership. Gerald Galloway

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